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5 AI Drifts Steering the Education Industry

By Education Technology Insights | Monday, August 19, 2019

Smart teaching and learning are evolving at a rapid rate, and artificial intelligence is playing an integral role in this transformation.

FREMONT, CA: Artificial Intelligence (AI) has made its way into the education sector. Smart technology-enabled classrooms, teaching tools, educational gadgets are making their presence felt. Although the traditional educational practices are still alive at the core, artificial intelligence is automating many aspects and making teaching as well as learning much more efficient, immersive, and relevant. While sci-fi ideas are yet to turn into reality, one can already see some exciting futuristic developments in the education sector.  

· Automating Assessment

Examination, assessment, and grading are integral to an education system. AI-backed assessment technology can renovate the traditional approach of manually assessing tests and records. By automating the evaluation of different tests and quizzes, AI can reduce the time taken for grading. It will ease the burden for teachers and enable better, accurate, and error-free practices.

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· Generating Valuable Feedback

The role of artificial intelligence does not end with the evaluation of test results as AI-based systems can monitor the progress of individual students to give highly detailed feedback. Online courses often use technology to generate insightful data regarding the performance of students. Based on the analysis, the platforms provide advice and recommendations to help students improve. Even in educational institutions, AI-driven programs for feedbacks are being adopted. Apart from enabling students to know their performance, it is also assisting educators in seeing how well students are responding to courses.

· Adaptive Learning

Modern educators understand the student-specific requirements and cater to them with tailored tech-driven ideas. How effectively a student can process educational information depends on many aspects such as speed, grasping ability, the potential to recall, and more. AI can make learning personalized and thus maximize the chances of adequate reception of concepts. Adaptive learning programs with activities suited to specific students can facilitate impactful yet easy learning. These AI-backed programs have the potential to change fundamental aspects of education, better it further.

· Assisting Teachers

No matter to what extent the education sector evolves, teachers can never be replaced by any virtual assistant. However, there will be an inevitable shift in the role of teachers as AI gets popular. AI can take over simple, repetitive tasks, allowing teachers to focus on the more profound insights into teaching. It can also make teaching better by providing tools to students and teachers that will improve the quality of education. Education can become flexible as the dependence of students on class-room teaching reduces. A future scenario where robots take classes cannot be ruled out.

· Improved Access to Relevant Educational Information

The education sector adopts AI to experience improved access to relevant information. The nature of AI makes it highly advantageous in education as it uses machine-level cognition to suggest and recommend information. It isn't feasible for a student to find the best information from such a vast amount of data that is available today. AI can assist by making education more information-oriented. How one interacts with information is also altered when AI is incorporated into the equation.

Apart from these primary uses, there are many examples of AI in education. Most of these are still in the experimental stage and might see broader adoption in a few years. Digitalization has brought about a revolution in the education sector, and with AI, the industry can vouch for far-reaching implications. Smart education programs will soon be the norm, and classrooms will become adaptive learning environments. 

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